Tuning, Pitch Accuracy and Pitch Preview

Posted: 4/14/2006 6:49:05 AM
omhoge

From: New York, NY

Joined: 2/13/2005

Let's branch this specialized discussion on pitch and tuning to off here?
Thanks gang for the thoughts so far...
http://www.thereminworld.com/forum.asp?cmd=p&T=1391&F=780&p=11
Posted: 4/14/2006 9:01:56 AM
omhoge

From: New York, NY

Joined: 2/13/2005

>>What The Audience Hears
I find I often have to switch my head when listening to music of any sort. I most certainly do not have perfect (or even well formed on some days) pitch, but I do suffer from detailed music visualization usually in the form of notation when listening to music. At work I sometimes have to stop listening to something I really like and switch to mindless tunes because the notes get in the way of my commuter screen (or worse I'll start to bob and hum without knowing it).
When listening in concert I've trained myself better to catch the wave if a player really engages me and silence the visual copyist and ride the music without inner comment, this usually results in color/pattern field visuals if I close my eyes but that usually does not pull me out of being at one with the musical event.
Most audiences from the MET to underground downtown clubs are not aware of the vagaries of intonation, the MET chorus was infamous for a long time but that never stopped them from wowing you in the big numbers.
Intonation is tremendously important but is an long term skill to developed and is fluid in performance. Musical events are not measured by tuning meters.
But they help a lot in the practice studio.
You can only really focus on one thing at a time, multitasking is an illusion.
My teachers in both voice and organ would make me separate things.
So in practice we'd have some passes at a piece where you're just hitting the pitches either very slowly or out of rhythm all together. Then other passes adding the rhythm exactly at a slow pace maybe with metronome. Finally you play the piece and at that pass you are focused on the musical event and it's proportions as an interpreter not a technician.

>>Air on the G string new piece played best of all
I find that pieces I've fully absorbed in my past lives play themselves sooner than new ones. The Air is one of those that's in my bones and sometimes if I'm too stressed or nervous about other newer pieces I'll just ... well I was going to say "play that one" but really I just step into the magic circle and let it come out, my ears are tuning it, I have to keep them awake but I don't let my mind talk to them about it.
Posted: 4/14/2006 9:28:02 AM
omhoge

From: New York, NY

Joined: 2/13/2005

Does anyone know of self contained ear training devices? Not computer app's or midi files, but a box kinda like the Simon toy that would play pitches and patterns at a rate you set that you can sing or match pitch to?
Posted: 4/15/2006 11:03:58 PM
Jason

From: Sammamish, Washington

Joined: 2/13/2005

How about the Perfectone? Is this what you're looking for?

http://www.samgoinnovations.com/home/index.cfm
Posted: 4/18/2006 11:28:59 AM
omhoge

From: New York, NY

Joined: 2/13/2005

Yes it just might, wish it had a better speaker but am checking out the site. thanks Jason!
Posted: 4/21/2006 2:40:08 PM
omhoge

From: New York, NY

Joined: 2/13/2005

In another forum vonbuck wrote
4/19/2006 2:09:16 PM
All made easier with a pitch preview. I finally got around to modifying my Pro for actual pitch previewing, and it's a whole new world
Andy
-------------------------
I have to echo this I was using the tuner output as it was which sometimes helped but could also be annoying. Having Moog do the mod for a real pitch preview is a "whole new world". I find it is helping a lot with entrances, leaps and keeping long or very soft notes in tune better. I recommend it. Also it does not seem to hinder my playing without it, in fact it seems to be helping that too either by muscle memory or increased confidence. You can also tune the pitch circuit silently, and with a tuner you can prep for out of the blue entrances if you do not have perfect pitch.

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