basic experiments

Posted: 2/10/2019 7:50:37 PM
JPascal

From: Berlin Germany

Joined: 4/27/2016

How to test the volume control circuit? I use a 555 timer with a double potentiometer to change the frequency of an asymmetrical square-wave generator. So I found the capacitors "in" and "out" of the voltage controlled attenuator to be to small. Replaced them by 3 µF non polar ones. 

A YT video shows the work in progress. It was a bit challenging to adjust the camera with my right hand and to do the rest with the left hand. So it's not for a movie award, but enjoy it anyway.

Posted: 4/13/2019 7:11:49 PM
JPascal

From: Berlin Germany

Joined: 4/27/2016

I've tried a few things lately with the volume control unit. The use of mono-flop or Schmitt trigger circuits to influence the initial part leads to plucking effects. However, a static effect that is not enough accelerated by the varying speed of my hand. Here is potential remaining yet for brain work.

In this context some thoughts to the walking bass effect. Pamelia Stickney said in a interview concerning plucking the hand outside but near the volume antenna, how I heard that out: "...how do you get the staccato and I thought much more efficient with the hand to move away from the antenna and use the thumb as a stopping place for the other fingers and then just control how slowly you want to open these fingers, bring down the sustain to silence, so you can choose how long you want your note to hold that you are plucking." This discribes the effect of an ADSR controller caused by her hand movements. 

One more reason to spend more time learning to play the theremin before circuits are developed! 

Posted: 4/14/2019 12:18:09 PM
coalport

From: Canada

Joined: 8/1/2008

The problem with the theremin “walking bass” is that even when it is skillfully done, it is extremely “pitchy” but we don’t notice it because it’s all happening in a register where the human ear is less pitch sensitive.  The bass line merrily bom-bom-boms along creating a wonderful illusion of an acoustic bass from the standpoint of timbre and amplification. It’s a great theremin novelty effect and it impresses the hell out of people, but it is not a serious tool for music making. 

Posted: 4/14/2019 9:21:00 PM
JPascal

From: Berlin Germany

Joined: 4/27/2016

It is interesting for me. The pitch in the bass range would be disturbed by the volume dynamic? Anyway, seems to be an artifact of ordinary theremines. But this play technique described could principally also be used in higher pitch ranges.

Posted: 4/15/2019 12:12:41 PM
coalport

From: Canada

Joined: 8/1/2008

If a theremin is properly set up and played using a technique that avoids lateral movement of the pitch hand toward the volume antenna, there should be no interference with pitch from volume control.

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