Etherwave Theremin Exploration Kit

Posted: 3/2/2005 2:07:32 AM
Tallwes

From: Portland, OR, USA, Terra, Sol, Milkyway

Joined: 3/1/2005

I decided that it is now the time for me to spring for an Etherwave. I know that the Etherwave Theremin Exploration Kit is not much of a deal. But, it is a handy way I can make sure I have all the essentials to get started. Is this a good way to go, or can I find better accessories (mice stand, cord, etc) somewhere else at the same or less cost?

As for mic stands, I am 6’6” tall and I will need my Etherwave up higher then the rest of you littleputtiansJ. From what I understand of mic stands, they are designed to extend up to the average littleputtian’s (normally sized person’s) mouth level, which is definitely up past my belly button height. Considering this fact, since I will be using the mic stand for holding a theremin up to my belly button level will any littleputtian sized (normal length) mic stand do, or will I still have a problem with back aches from bending down to reach my volume loop and should look for a longer then normal mic stand (if such a thing exists)?J Will the mic stand included with the Etherwave Theremin Exploration kit be long enough? Is the mic stand included with the Etherwave Theremin Exploration not too wobbly, unstable so as not to be an unreasonable fall hazard for my Etherwave or should I look for a more stable mic stand?

If you want to give me feedback on the TB-15 amplifier please see and reply to my separate post (topic: TB-15 Amplifier) about the TB-15.
Posted: 3/2/2005 4:58:25 AM
TomFarrell

From: Undisclosed location without Dick Cheney

Joined: 2/21/2005

"I know that the Etherwave Theremin Exploration Kit is not much of a deal."

It's a marginal savings, but it's not *bad*...

"But, it is a handy way I can make sure I have all the essentials to get started. Is this a good way to go, or can I find better accessories (mice stand, cord, etc) somewhere else at the same or less cost?"

Most mic stands are decent, I'd guess theirs is fine. Think of it this way: if the stand fails in any way during the warranty period and causes any damage to the Theremin, if you're using Moog's stand, you can blame the whole thing on them and insist they fix it.

The cord... you can use a standard guitar cord, it doesn't need to be anything special. They cost about $10 to $20 in a music store, depending on length. I think that's what Moog charges, so no surprise there.

A decent amp is going to run about $100 I think. (I got one cheaper and regret it.) That's what Moog charges for their amp. I see you posted separately about whether or not it's a good amp. I'm interested to see the responses too.


"As for mic stands, I am 6’6” tall and I will need my Etherwave up higher then the rest of you littleputtiansJ. From what I understand of mic stands, they are designed to extend up to the average littleputtian’s (normally sized person’s) mouth level, which is definitely up past my belly button height. Considering this fact, since I will be using the mic stand for holding a theremin up to my belly button level will any littleputtian sized (normal length) mic stand do, or will I still have a problem with back aches from bending down to reach my volume loop and should look for a longer then normal mic stand (if such a thing exists)?"

Unless Moog's stand is abnormally short, you should have no problems. I don't think I've ever seen a mic stand that couldn't hold the Theremin up uncomfortably high for you if desired. I'm 6'2 and I often find myself moving it down a foot or two after I set it up and start practicing.

In short, if you want to just order the set from Moog so you don't want to have to worry about it, pending comments on the amp, I think you should be fine.
Posted: 3/2/2005 3:55:53 PM
DiggyDog

From: Jax, FL

Joined: 2/14/2005

A regular mic stand will bring the instrument up plenty high enough. You could put it at chest level if you wanted to using any mic stand.

I recently had to mount my Etherwave on a boom stand that was at about eye level (because of interference in a crowded reheasrsal room) and the pitch antenna was almost touching the ceiling.

The only thing to worry about is the higher it gets, the more likely it wil wobble if knocked or tripped over.

Just be careful and you will be fine.
Posted: 3/2/2005 4:35:08 PM
ThereMan

From: chicago illinois

Joined: 2/15/2005

diggydog-this is a bit off topic,but i have yet to play my theremin with my band and i am wondering what happens when you get interference and what is the best way to prevent or fix it?
Posted: 3/2/2005 4:35:10 PM
ThereMan

From: chicago illinois

Joined: 2/15/2005

diggydog-this is a bit off topic,but i have yet to play my theremin with my band and i am wondering what happens when you get interference and what is the best way to prevent or fix it?
Posted: 3/3/2005 8:27:23 AM
DiggyDog

From: Jax, FL

Joined: 2/14/2005

The best thing to do is to stake out some prime real estate when setting up the equipment for the show. I usually stay away from the middle and set up on one end or the other, usually stage left (the performers' left, that is).

The only time I have had problems is in the crowded rehearsal space we used once (as described earlier).

Also, make sure you can hear the instrument. I play bass too and I have done gigs where I could hardly hear what I was playing. With the bess there are frets and if I have rehearsed and the instrument is tune I can muddle through without being able to hear much.

Obviously with the theremin that would not be possible. Either set up your amp near you or make sure you have it going through the monitors and you will be fine.
Posted: 3/3/2005 9:14:45 AM
regmtait

From: UK

Joined: 2/15/2005

Yep, it can be a total nightmare with loads of other loud instruments blaring away at the same time. Just make sure you do a decent soundcheck and have it turned up in the monitors if needed. Another issue is have other musicians leaping about and interfering with your 'space'. Can't do much about that really; it comes with the territory.
Posted: 3/3/2005 9:18:33 AM
regmtait

From: UK

Joined: 2/15/2005

Just reading back up the discussion...I'd definitely recommend a good, sturdy mic stand. It felt like a whole new instrument when i replace my flimsy cheapo stand with a decent one.
Posted: 3/3/2005 10:24:12 AM
DiggyDog

From: Jax, FL

Joined: 2/14/2005

I have been lucky. The band I play theremin with is a pretty stationary group of people. They don't do a whole lot of leaping around, although a cute audience member of the female persuasion jumped up on stage with us last Saturday and danced around my control zone a little.

I didn't complain, though. She was hot and I hope my wife doesn't read this board....
Posted: 3/3/2005 10:50:03 AM
Jason

From: Sammamish, Washington

Joined: 2/13/2005

Regarding mic stands...

I definitely prefer the 3-legged variety over the "round heavy metal base" variety. It seems to provide more stability for the theremin.

I think an ideal stand might be a camera-style tripod mount, where the legs meet much closer to the top of the stand, providing ultimate stability. The downside, of course, is that it might get in the way of standing close to the instrument. I'm also not sure how you'd actually mount a theremin to a camera tripod, but I'm sure it could be done.

This is especially important for the Etherwave Pro theremin. Even though it included a 3-legged stand, it's so heavy that it has a tendancy to rock back and forth a bit even when it's tight on the stand.

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