Plan B Teacher

Posted: 12/29/2019 6:17:25 PM
DanielMacKay

From: Halifax, Canada (east coast)

Joined: 7/28/2019

In my city there is no master thereminist, no one for me to take lessons from.

So if I'm going to get some coaching, it'll have to be someone who usually coaches another instrument.

I'm thinking voice is *probably* the best choice, but violin might also make sense.

What do you think that should be?

Posted: 12/29/2019 7:52:31 PM
DreadVox

From: The East of Netherlands

Joined: 6/18/2019

Cello could be another one. It would also depend on what you want to learn or strengthen, learning to play existing works would take another approach than learning to get better at improvising. A teacher who can play an instrument that can be an accompaniment or an improvisation partner, who can give tips and pointers to how to play in a context of playing together, and practice with you on that, whether fixed pieces or improv could be valuable, as long as you're not going to find a teacher who can teach specific theremin-technical skills.

Posted: 12/30/2019 10:51:44 AM
RoyP

From: Scotland

Joined: 9/27/2012

Don't discount Skype lessons, they can be valuable even although they are long distance.

Several people do these lessons: Lydia Kavina, Carolina Eyck, Thierry Frenkel (I think) and Thomas Grillo (he used to do), among others, all do them.

Kip Rosser also has a series of online lessons which are useful.

Posted: 12/30/2019 11:37:32 AM
DanielMacKay

From: Halifax, Canada (east coast)

Joined: 7/28/2019

RoyP: ahaha wow I'm not good enough to get master class lessons like that.  But it's exciting to think that some day I might.  

And... ahaahh Kip Rosser's lessons are WILD!  I sometimes browse through them and drop in in the middle somewhere.

Posted: 12/31/2019 3:22:04 AM
RoyP

From: Scotland

Joined: 9/27/2012

Daniel, it's surprising how inspirational and helpful just one or two lessons can be to get you started :-)

Posted: 12/31/2019 3:41:59 AM
bendra

From: Portland, Oregon

Joined: 2/22/2018

I think it makes sense to want a local teacher who you can work with. Someone with a voice or strings background would probably work because they are used to teaching ear training. Most important is someone who likes similar music to you so your not trying to fit a square peg into a round hole as it were.

At the same time, a couple of Skype lessons cwith an expert player an be very beneficial in getting your basic mechanics down. Carolina Eyck and Randy George both helped me a lot with this and it's a good way to support them. 

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