Vibrato and Tremolo

Posted: 7/10/2007 3:06:47 PM
Thomas Grillo

From: Jackson Mississippi

Joined: 8/13/2006

Yes, I do notice the difference especially on my Pro. If I use a fast, but very shallow vibrato, especially when throwing the dart at the audience, I actually get an old fashioned theater organ like overtone. If I use slow vibrato, I don't get the overtone.

This is really noticable in my youtube video of Mother, A Word That Means The World To Me.
Posted: 7/25/2007 6:40:55 PM
omhoge

From: New York, NY

Joined: 2/13/2005

Something I've noticed in both vibrato (towards and back / darts) and tremolo (side to side / ping pong) is the entire arm from the neck to the fingers is involved and relaxed and no joint is ever locked; the fingers, wrist, elbow and shoulder all contribute to varying degrees depending on the musical effect and the pitch.
When in the zone and mostly listening, the "sonic variance technique" my pitch arm uses may very from phrase to phrase especially when shifting two or more octaves.
Posted: 7/25/2007 8:35:13 PM
Thomas Grillo

From: Jackson Mississippi

Joined: 8/13/2006

I've noticed that here too, but with me, most of my vibrato effort tends to be focust mainly in the forearm, and some in the wrist. But the upper arm, and shoulder does get into the act to some extent as well, mosty for support. Sometimes when first warming up, my fast bibrato might swing a bit to far, and not fast enough with a bit of discomfort near the elbow until I've run through several long pieces, about 20 minutes, and then the vibrato tightens up, and gets shallower, and faster like Rockmore's
Posted: 7/27/2007 12:19:46 PM
kkissinger

From: Kansas City, Mo.

Joined: 8/23/2005

When I first started to play the theremin, I tried very hard to control the width of my vibrato -- perhaps in a self-conscious effort to avoid an overly-wide vibrato.

I would have made faster progress if I had focused on placing the center of the vibrato precisely on the target note without over emphasizing the width.

In controlling the width, I tended to put the center of the vibrato below the target note. This seems to be a tendency among thereminists in general.

The ear tends to latch on to the top of the vibrato and to tune to the top of the cycle places everything else flat.

Pamelia Kurstin is acknowledged to have a particularly keen sense of pitch and she places the top of the vibrato clearly above the target pitch. Her vibrato is, in reality, quite wide however it never occurs as "overdone".

Speaking of Pamelia Kurstin, she remembers to keep her vibrato active on the tail of notes.

When starting out I had a tendency to make my vibrato slower and narrower on the note tails. However, my practice recordings revealed that to keep the vibrato going on the tails is much more effective. Again, Pamelia Kurstin kind of shows the way on this... in fact, if my ears are not fooling me, she may widen her vibrato on the note tails.

I still like my note heads to have minimal vibrato so that there is "somewhere to go" as the note continues. However, I tend to like the sound when the tail continues with vibrato.

Thus, I suggest that while one may be aware of one's vibrato width, one need not fear it! The placement of the center of the vibrato is more critical than the width.

[i]-- Kevin[/i]
Posted: 7/27/2007 10:35:18 PM
Thomas Grillo

From: Jackson Mississippi

Joined: 8/13/2006

It's not your imagination about her vibrato. I remember a segment of her DVD in which she visually talked about the relative position of the note within a vibrato, and how having the vibrato too far off center can affect pitch.
Posted: 1/14/2009 8:52:35 AM
omhoge

From: New York, NY

Joined: 2/13/2005

Peter posted some good stuff at
starrykitten's first thread (http://www.thereminworld.com/forum.asp?F=780&T=3759&cmd=p&p=1)
thanks all!

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